Dallas Lesbian Opens Fertility Practice for LGBT Couples

lesbianCarolina Azevedo didn’t ever want children of her own; however she did want to help those who couldn’t have kids.

Last year she donated her eggs to help a gay couple in California. Her only requirement was that the children be told Azevedo was their biological mother if they wanted to know when they turned 18.

Fortunately, the dads wanted an open relationship with Azevedo so when the twins were born, Azevedo knew them from early on.

“I was psychologically prepared for what I did. I felt very lucky that they wanted an open relationship,” she said. “Having an open relationship is so much fun because you get to see the gift you gave someone and how you’ve turned their life around. You gave them something no one else can.”

After helping one family, Azevedo wanted to help more. With the help of Dr. Gary Ramsey at the Pacific Fertility Institute, Azevedo started her own company, Family Fertility Solutions, which helps straight and lesbian couples, and Two Dads and a Baby, which help gay men.

Azevedo’s agency takes care of everything a couple needs to have a baby. From figuring out doctors and lawyers, to booking flights and hotels for adoption and surrogacy, to finding donors, surrogates, in vitro fertilization, to fertility yoga, acupuncture, and weight management programs, Azevedo will take care of any client needs.

Azevedo said because of her partnerships with other agencies, like a surrogacy agency which would normally cost about $25,000, would only cost her clients about $15,000.

Though based in Dallas, Azevedo has helped couples internationally in China and Brazil with surrogacy and adoption options in their country.

“I want to make a difference in Dallas since I live here, but I also want to make a difference worldwide,” Azevedo said.

Because Azevedo’s wife is 21 years older, the couple originally decided against having children of their own. However, since seeing the twins being born last year, the couple has decided to start a family of their own.

“I think the next step is gay families,” Azevedo said. “And I want to be the one to provide that in my city.”